©2018 by Reasoning and Memory Lab.
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WELCOME TO THE REASONING AND MEMORY LAB

 

Welcome to the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Reasoning and Memory Lab (RAM Lab). We are a part of the Department of Psychology‘s Experimental Program at UNLV. In the RAM Lab, we conduct psychological research studies that examine topics in cognitive psychology. One line of research explores mental models that people construct in long-term memory when reading about or viewing events. Memory representations are more than just words, and they can include images as well as representations of people and environments. The interaction of long-term memory and working memory is also explored in our research. Another line of research examines how people use memory to reason and make decisions. This includes an examination of memory processes used during reasoning, factors that may bias people, strategies that people use, and the effects of working memory limitations. In addition, we also examine cognitive processing as it relates to applied topics.

 
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VISUAL LANGUAGE NARRATIVE

Law and Justice, Legality concept, Scale

PSYCHOLOGY AND LAW

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MEMORY AND STEREOTYPING

PEOPLE

DAVID E. COPELAND, PH.D.

Principal Investigator / Associate Professor

David earned his Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Notre Dame. His research focuses on memory representations in long-term memory and working memory, as well as human reasoning processes.

David is currently the Undergraduate Director in Psychology at UNLV. He has earned the UNLV College of Liberal Arts William Morris Award for Excellence in Teaching, was recognized as an Outstanding Mentor by the UNLV Graduate and Professional Student Association (GPSA), and was awarded the UNLV Outstanding Student Organization Advisor of the Year for his work with Psi Chi and Psychology Club.

He has been invited to speak on issues relating to memory, cognition, and student development for professional organizations, the Las Vegas Science and Technology Festival, teacher workshops, and advanced placement courses in the Clark County School District. In addition, he has been invited to speak at national and regional psychology conferences and for numerous UNLV campus events, including faculty development workshops, research fairs, and student organization meetings.

Courses Taught:

PSY 101 / HON 201 General Psychology
PSY 200 Introduction to the Psychology Major
PSY 240 Research Methods
PSY 316 Cognitive Psychology
PSY 703 Graduate Cognitive Psychology
PSY 717 Graduate Cognitive Methods

AMBER R. WILLIAMS, B.S.

Doctoral Student

Amber Williams earned her B.S. in psychology from Charleston Southern University. Her research focuses on the use of stereotypes and mental representations regarding sexual orientation.

Courses Taught:

PSY 101 General Psychology
PSY 360 Foundations of Social Psychology

JACKSON S. PELZNER, M.S.

Doctoral Student

Jackson Pelzner earned his B.S. in psychology from Acadia University and his M.S. in applied psychological science from Pacific University. His research focuses on visual language theory and music cognition.

WILLIAM B. RIDGWAY, M.A.

Doctoral Student

William Ridgway earned his B.S. in psychology from University of Oregon and his M.A. in forensic psychology from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. His research focuses on jury decision-making, eyewitness memory, and death penalty issues.

 

PAST GRADUATE STUDENTS

A Collaborative & Diverse Group

 

KATHLEEN LARSON, PH.D

Kathleen earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology from UNLV in 2017 and now works as a researcher at the Air Force Research Laboratory. While at UNLV, she earned the Science, Mathematics, & Research for Transformation (SMART) scholarship and completed internships at the Air Force Research Laboratory.

PUBLISHED WORK

Selected Publications

 

Schroeder, P.J., Copeland, D.E., & Bies-Hernandez, N.J. (2012). The influence of story context on a working memory span task. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 65, 488-500.


Copeland, D.E., Gunawan, K., & Bies-Hernandez, N.J. (2011). Source credibility and syllogistic reasoning. Memory & Cognition39, 117-127.

Radvansky, G.A., & Copeland, D.E. (2010). Reading times and the detection of event shift processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 36, 210-216.

Copeland, D.E., Scott, J.R., & Houska, J.A. (2010). Computer-based demonstrations in cognitive psychology: Benefits and costs. Teaching of Psychology, 37, 141-145.

Copeland, D.E., & Radvanksy, G.A. (2007). Aging and integrating spatial mental models. Psychology & Aging, 22(3), 569-579.

Radvansky, G.A., & Copeland, D.E. (2006). Walking through doorways causes forgetting: Situation models and experienced space. Memory & Cognition34(5), 1150-1156.

Copeland, D.E., & Radvansky, G.A. (2004). Working memory and syllogistic reasoning. Quarterly Journal of  Experimental Psychology, 57, 1437-1457.

Copeland, D.E., & Radvansky, G.A. (2001). Phonological similarity in working memory. Memory & Cognition, 29, 774-776.

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CONTACT US

Department of Psychology | UNLV
4505 Maryland Parkway Box 455030
Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-1003
(702) 895-3305 | Fax: (702) 895-0195